To access the free offer below, become a subscriber by clicking here now. The free video viewing will be available to all subscribers beginning on the afternoon of November 15th 

PostDividerPic
 
 
I’m giving free access to a 20-minute video, available for three days to all subscribers. It is the first of three segments I’ve put together for two reasons:
 
 
1) Dearth of time during a short course doesn’t allow adequate coverage of applicable matrix theory in class.
2) The material was organized to drive home a fundamental point: Math without insight is grossly inadequate. That lesson will be useful to professors, instructors, and mentors as well as designers.
I start with a no-math real-world example dramatically illustrating preference for insight over blind acceptance of computer outputs.
PostDividerPic
 
FREE PREVIEWS
Each of the three parts has a preview that can be watched free at any time. Click Here
If you click on any section, options include a preview for no cost (white circle on the right). Attendees of any course I teach will receive free 3-day access all three parts, and others (e.g., students or trainees) would also benefit from this information. An admission: The recording was done during hay-fever season; I sound (and look) like it. That’s unimportant in comparison to the message.
 
 
HomePageNewBookPicIn addition you will receive a 100 page excerpt form my latest book GNSS Aided Navigation and Tracking
 
 
MORE TO COME
My website now has excerpts from a wide variety of topics, all of which can be expanded further into helpful learning aids — backed by a long history of real-world experience and insights very much in need today. Occasionally I make incremental additions generated for release. As always, subscribers have the option for subsequent opt-out with no danger of further contact, spam, etc.

 

A video completed recently provides just enough matrix theory needed for Kalman filtering. It’s available for  (1) purchase or 72-hour rent at low cost or (2) free to those attending courses I teach in 2014 or after (because the short durations don’t allow time to cover it). The one-hour presentation is divided into three sections. Each section has a preview, freely viewable.

 

 

The first section, with almost NO math, begins by explaining why matrices are needed — and then immediately emphasizes that MATH ALONE IS NOT ENOUGH, To drive home that point, a dramatic illustration was chosen. Complex motions of a satellite, though represented in a MATHEMATICALLY correct way, were not fully understood by its designers nor by the first team of analysts contracted to characterize it. From those motions, shown with amplitudes enlarged (e.g., doubled or possibly more) for easy visualization, it becomes clear why insight is every bit as important as the math.

 

EmailMarketingPicFor some viewers the importance of insight alone will be of sufficient interest with no need for the latter two sections. Others, particularly novices aspiring to be designers, will find the math presentation extremely helpful. Straight to the point for each step where matrices are applied, it is just the type of information I was earnestly seeking years ago, whole “pulling teeth” to extract clarification of ONLY NECESSARY theory without OVER simplification.

 

The presentation supplies matrix theory prerequisites that will assist aspiring designers in formulating linear(ized) estimation algorithms in block (weighted least squares) or sequential (recursive Kalman/EKF) form. Familiar matrix types (e.g., orthogonal, symmetric), their properties, how they are used — and why they are useful — with interpretation of physical examples, enable important operations both powerful and versatile. An enormous variety of applications involving systems of any order can be solved in terms of familiar expressions we saw as teenagers in college.

 

Useful for either introduction or review, there is no better way to summarize this material than to repeat one word that matters beyond all else — INSIGHT.

John Bortz

In February of this year the navigation community lost a major contributor to navigation — John Bortz. To many his name is best known in connection with “the Bortz equation” which easily deserves a note here to highlight its significance in development of strapdown inertial nav. Before his work in the early 1970s, strapdown was widely considered as something with possible promise “maybe, if only it could ever come out of the lab-&-theory realm” and into operation. Technological capabilities we take for granted today were far less advanced then; among the many state-of-the-art limitations of that time, processing speed is a glaringly obvious example. To make a long story short, John Bortz made it all happen anyway. Applying the previously mentioned equation (outgrowth of an early investigation of Draper Lab’s Dr. J.H. Laning) was only part of his achievement. Working with 1960s hardware and those old computers, he made a historic mark in the annals of strapdown.  Still, importance of that accomplishment should not obscure his other credentials. For example, he also made significant contributions to radio navigation — and he spent the lst two decades of his life as a deacon.

4/11/2013
Press Release

 

James L Farrell launches his new Kindle book – GPS Made Simple

 KindleBookPic

James L Farrell, author of  GNSS Aided Navigation & Tracking & Integrated Aircraft Navigation has just launched his new book on the Amazon platform Kindle. The book is now available for Android tablets, iPads and of course Kindle Fire. The book sells for  $3.99 and available in the  Kindle Store.

 

 

Book Description

Publication Date: April 8, 2013
This presentation provides a basic understanding of GPS for those trying to learn it for the first time. Although satellite navigation now includes constellations from Europe and Asia, all have enough in common to focus on GPS for introductory discussion. Material was selected and organized with a a learner’s perspective in mind. for a “straight-to-the-point” exposition with little or no mathematics and, rather than an extensive bibliography, a few few URLs that can be followed towards a wealth of further sources for those interested.
 
 

Product Details

  • File Size: 592 KB
  • Publisher: VIGIL, Inc. (April 8, 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CA4N4Y8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled

I perform functional formulations and algorithm generation plus validation for both simulation and operational purposes in system integration. Specific areas include navigation, communication, data integrity, and tracking for aerospace, applying modern estimation to data from various sources (COMM, gyros, accelerometers, GPS/GNSS, radar, optical, etc.). 

Complete Viewable & printable Resume Click Here
(opens in new window)

 

At ION GNSS 2011 in Portland OR, Javad Ashjaee, James L. Farrell and others participated in a panel discussing the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security’s concerns on the effects of GPS jamming and spoofing on our national critical infrastructure.

 

 As Dr. Todd Humphreys noted, U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security recently completed a risk assessment of the effects of GPS jamming and spoofing on national critical infrastructure. Some of us participated as subject matter experts in this assessment.

 

The DHS report, which is the most thorough one to date on this topic, has left many people saying “Yes, it’s a problem. Now what?”

This panel addressed the question “Now what?”

 

Topic: How do we secure civil GNSS?

 

Schedule

    • 8:30: Welcome and introduction: Moderator introduces topic, format, and ground rules
    • 8:40: Moderator introduces panelists
    • 8:45: Moderator frames the central question: “How do we secure civil GNSS?”
    • 8:50: Logan Scott
    • 9:00: Panel/audience response to Logan’s remarks
    • 9:10: Javad Ashjaee
    • 9:20: Panel/audience response to Javad’s remarks
    • 9:30: Mark Psiaki
    • 9:40: Panel/audience response to Mark’s remarks
    • 9:50: Questions from audience, discussion among panelists

10:05 — 10:35: Morning break

  • 10:35: Moderator welcomes audience and panel back, summarizes morning discussion
  • 10:40: Oscar Pozzobon
  • 10:50: Panel/audience response to Oscar’s remarks
  • 11:00:James Farrell
  • 11:10: Panel/audience response to James’s remarks
  • 11:20: Felix Kneißl
  • 11:30: Panel/audience response to Felix’s remarks
  • 11:40: Questions from audience; discussion among panelists
  • 12:10: Moderator and panelists offer concluding remarks
  • 12:15: Panel concludes

ION GNSS 2011

September 19-23, 2011 (Tutorials: September 19-20)
Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon

 

 

 

POST-CONFERENCE UPDATE

A subsequent experiment conducted in Texas, attracting national attention at that time, became the topic of eMail communications among several professionals in the satnav community.  That sequence of communications resulted in a summary published in GPSWorld.